Let Love Guide You Through It All by Tiara

11 Jan 2018 1:05 PM

Guest Blogger Guest Blogger

Learning to love your learning will guarantee you success in college (and arguably in your life). While we all come to college for various reasons, there is a singular implied objective that we all share: earning a degree. The journey to the degree is not always on a clearly defined, straight path; I personally have had my share of challenges and discouragements, ranging from personal to financial to academic, along the way. Things change; circumstances, motivations, priorities, dreams, and many other things change as time moves forward and can make navigating how to secure your degree more difficult. I have learned to leverage the things that remain constant, one of them being the expectation that I learn.

Photo of Tiara

Each assignment, each exam, along with each individual and group project has been created to ensure that I (like the other students at Iowa State University) learn something. School intends for its students to learn something; I get that there is no surprise there, but the opportunity for leverage is there.

Focusing on the learning expectation is what helped me to do better, which brings me back to my original point of the importance of loving your learning. Statistically speaking, there is bound to be classes that each of us does not love, find relevant, or want to take. How are we supposed to love those classes, right? First, think about what it means to love. I associate the act of love with putting forth genuine, substantial effort to express care and commitment. Now consider the benefits of learning; in my opinion, they are growth and understanding. What reason is there to not put forth genuine, substantial effort to express care and commitment towards one’s own growth and understanding? I cannot think of one.

Blue box with gold specs. (text) I’m a young, Black woman at a predominantly white institution who has experienced both racism and sexism on more than one occasion; none of those experiences were pleasant and, at the time of the incidents, I wasn’t thinking “how lucky am I to experience this awful thing because I going to grow.” I say that to say that one should never allow the distractions and negatives to overcome the entire experience.When you approach a course or this whole college thing in general as an opportunity to grow and develop or further enhance your understanding of something, the negatives (whatever they may be) all exist for a greater good. I don’t say that to say that life suddenly becomes peaches and cream. I’m a young, Black woman at a predominantly white institution who has experienced both racism and sexism on more than one occasion; none of those experiences were pleasant and, at the time of the incidents, I wasn’t thinking “how lucky am I to experience this awful thing because I'm going to grow.” I say that to say that one should never allow the distractions and negatives to overcome the entire experience.

I challenge you, just as I have challenged myself, to actively pursue loving the experience of learning despite the content and its relevance to your life, despite your professor, despite your classmates, and despite whatever else is distracting you from the experience of learning.

 

In My Words     Black/African American, College of Engineering, WiSE